Muffins!

posted in: Bake, First Foods | 0

I’m really excited to share this first food, because it’s the first recipe I’ve ever created on my own! Last year, I made quite a few muffin recipes–from zucchini to apple, whole wheat to regular flour. After a few batches, I started to notice that most muffin recipes were very similar, with just a few variations here and there in the mix-ins and the types of flours used. So, I sat down and wrote out my own recipe for whole wheat muffins with my choice of fruit (apple, banana, strawberry, etc.) or veggie (zucchini, carrot, sweet potato, etc.) mix-in. This recipe has worked for me, but I’m sure you can get various results.

Muffins | firsttimefoods.com

I love making muffins because they’re pretty easy and quick, I usually have all the ingredients on hand, and they’re sweet enough that I enjoy eating them as a snack, but I can still consider them healthy enough for breakfast because of the fruit, whole wheat flour, and oatmeal in them.

Muffins | firsttimefoods.comMuffins | firsttimefoods.comMuffins | firsttimefoods.com

My recipe makes a batch of about 15 small muffins. I really don’t like those large muffins sold commercially (they feel too big to eat in one sitting), so mine are usually about the size of cupcakes, but feel free to make bigger (or mini) muffins as you like them. This time around, I made a double batch, since I was sharing them with L. Smith who loves them, and he can eat quite a bit, especially after a weekend “long run” (He’s training for a marathon, so the long runs are especially long!). For this explanation, I’m going to write out the ingredients for a single batch.

I started with the dry ingredients: 1 cup of whole wheat flour (I used Trader Joe’s; I use King Arthur when I can get it on sale), ½ cup of all purpose four, ½ cup of oats, 1 tsp of baking soda, 1 tsp of baking powder, ¼ tsp of salt, and 2 tsp of cinnamon. (Use more or less, depending on whether you like cinnamon or not–I love it because it always makes things seem more fall-like). I mixed them with a whisk and then set them aside.

Muffins | firsttimefoods.comMuffins | firsttimefoods.com

Next, I peeled and cored 3 small apples. I used a grater to create an applesauce-like consistency, but included some smaller pieces for texture; this probably came out to 1 to 1 ¼ cups. As I mentioned above, this recipe allows for the mix-in of your choice, so feel free to experiment and even add multiple fruits or veggie gratings. Other wet ingredients include: 1 egg, 1 cup of milk or buttermilk, 1 tsp of vanilla, and 1 cup of yogurt. I mixed until combined and then added this to the dry ingredients. I used a spatula to mix just until the ingredients were combined (do not over-mix).

I finally got some additional silicone baking cups, so now I’m up to a total of eighteen now and I can do larger batches in the oven, which definitely speeds up baking, as compared to when I only had six.

I filled the cups 2/3 of the way. They rise slightly during baking until they’re just barely over the top, similar to cupcakes. You can fill them higher if you like muffins that pop over the top and create that characteristic “muffin top.” I baked them in a 350˚ F oven for 20 minutes, until a toothpick came out clean. I removed from the oven, and allowed them to cool on a baking rack.

Muffins | firsttimefoods.com

This is my go-to recipe, but I’m open to trying new ones that catch my eye, so if you have suggestions, let me know!

Muffins | firsttimefoods.com

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